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Family Update – Spring 2022

We are due for an update. Actually, when I go for coffee with people, or when I have phone conversations with all of you, this is the topic that comes up the most, and usually first. What are you guys up to? Where is the Lord leading you, etc…

When we went for family debriefing one of the counselors shared how going through a transition like this was like crossing the Golden Gate Bridge. When you start it’s rare that you can see the end of the bridge because there’s usually fog in the middle. We are in that fog. There will be an end to the bridge, we just don’t know yet what it will look like.

So, in the meantime, the kids are plugging away at school. Olivia has been thriving at a small Christian School in St. Petersburg that runs the A.C.E. curriculum. Thaddeus and Sarah are doing a superb job at keeping up with Calvary Preparatory Academy online. We get to see Isabelle regularly even though she’s plugged into the Zeal School of Ministryen at Calvary Chapel Fellowship of St. Petersburg.

Gen has had the opportunity to do some music recently. She’s led worship for a few churches, and has been slowly making some connections with other musicians and song-writers here.

And, I’ve had the privilege of teaching a few times at various churches. For the next couple of months I’ve been asked to do “pulpit supply” at Azalea Baptist Church in St. Petersburg while they search for a new pastor.

We are both continuing some individual counselling that was provided for us after the family debriefing. I feel like I’m in the locker room at halftime. I have almost 20 years of ministry (great ministry!) behind me and it’s good to take some time to pause and reflect. I’m doing some reading, lots of talking and praying and considering what kinds of changes I’d like to make in preparation for the next 20 years.

I’m encouraged by two things. First, that when the gardener comes through and prunes, it’s in order that there might be “much more fruit.” Second, I’m encouraged because I felt the Lord make Psalm 32:8-11 personal to me recently.

“I will instruct you and show you the way to go; with my eye on you, I will give counsel. Do not be like a horse or mule, without understanding, that must be controlled with bit and bridle or else it will not come near you. Many pains come to the wicked, but the one who trusts in the Lord will have faithful love surrounding him.”
‭‭Psalms‬ ‭32:8-10‬ ‭CSB‬‬

https://bible.com/bible/1713/psa.32.8-10.CSB

We are still living temporarily in a 2 bedroom condo in South Tampa. It’s like an overgrown hotel room and the pool is really, really nice. We are still doing lots of paperwork from our move, it’s incredible how many details still need attention.

Because it looks like we will be in this transition for the rest of the calendar year, and because a handful of people wanted to support us financially through it, I’ve registered as a missionary with Axia International. They can receive donations on our behalf in any currency and will help us with the paperwork associated with it. As you might imagine, the honorariums from pulpit supply and guest speaking and worship leading are a tremendous blessing but don’t quite cover all our expenses. We would like to stay available for ministry and make good use of this “halftime.”

So, that’s the update!

 
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Posted by on April 21, 2022 in Uncategorized

 

Book Review: “If You Can Keep It” by Eric Metaxas

Book Review: “If You Can Keep It” by Eric Metaxas

There’s always a story to how I get a book and why I read it in the first place. You might find this story interesting.

Earlier this year, I reconnected with my friend Don here in Tampa. He’s the one that introduced me to the people at “County Citizens Defending Freedom” and introduced me to “Kingstone Comics.” In all of my conversations with him, he’s been urging me to read this book. Because I currently don’t have an income, I wasn’t looking to purchase anything extra. It’s on hold at the local library with a bunch of people in line waiting for it.

Olivia had spring break a couple of weeks ago, and my friend Gary asked me if I would be willing to drive a car from Illinois down to Tampa for him. Olivia and I took a flight and drove his car down (and that’s a story for another time) stopping along the way to visit my family that I don’t get to see that often. We had a ball.

When we visited my cousin, Jeremy in Tennessee, he took us to his work and we got to see and sit in the fire trucks and visit the rescue squad equipment depot and also tour his church. They had a lending library and I took a couple of minutes to peruse their selection, and there near the top of a pile of books to be sorted, in this Baptist church, in a small town called Camden, was this book. They let me take it.

Mr. Metaxas is a great writer. A few years ago, I read his Bonhoeffer biography and “7 Men.” My first exposure to him, however, was a speech he gave in Ottawa at the National Prayer Breakfast. He talked about abortion. That was one of the best speeches I’ve ever heard in my life. I don’t know how Justin Trudeau survived it. He was sitting nearby. As a writer, he makes the rest of us look like we are in kindergarten. His use of a variety of words and interesting turns of phrase I find to be beautiful. His subject matter was engaging.

The basic premise is that the foundation of our country has been forgotten. He was Yale educated and never exposed to the wealth of the thoughts, ideas and even art that produced the United States. In this book, he takes the time to tell some stories that used to be told and haven’t been lately. He also exposes how the founders and their society thought about the US and why it was in their words… “exceptional.” He also gives some historical context that helps us to understand why the US was founded in the first place.

I know now why my friend Don was urging me to read it. It’s needed and necessary and very accessible.

Mr. Metaxas starts with a story of Benjamin Franklin in conversation with a citizen at the close of the Continental Congress. It’s where the line “if you can keep it” comes from. He closes with an incredible story about the Statue of Liberty from his own family’s experience. Within the book is the backstory of Paul Revere, told afresh in the midst of the backstory of Longfellow and his poem, cast in the meilleur of our educational and cultural moment. All of these stories propelled me along, causing me to finish the book faster than I anticipated.

I read the backstory of Squanto to the family over dinner. It’s too good not to tell.

But, the chapter that will leave a lasting impression on me was his recounting of the influence of George Whitfield. He argues that the US would not exist, and would have no national identity without him. I’ve read Whitefield’s biography, I’m familiar with the story. But, this was a story about the US and Whitefield was a character in that story, and to consider the impact he made is quite revelatory.

The other thing I’ll walk away with from this book is another viewing of “Amazing Grace” and the story of William Wilberforce. I haven’t read his biography yet.

Maybe, when I come across that one, I’ll have another interesting story to share. And, hopefully, by that time, my writing skills will improve!

 
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Posted by on March 30, 2022 in Book Review

 

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Book Review: “The Man Behind the Curtain – Inside the Secret Network of George Soros” by Matt Palumbo

Book Review: “The Man Behind the Curtain – Inside the Secret Network of George Soros” by Matt Palumbo

There’s always an interesting story behind every book. And, this one doesn’t disappoint. I’m actually hesitant to share these details publicly because our society is so divided at the moment about some very important issues. Because of the animosity, the impulse is to protect, but that comes at the expense of sharing helpful information.

Because of my experience in Canada, I’ve been awakened to the need to be more involved in the political process. It’s part of being a fully functioning adult in our society and a mature Christian. Our ancestors gave us the privilege of self-government through a representational democracy (or republic) and not only do we have the right to vote, but to also run for office, lobby, petition and even protest. In the transition back to Florida, I knew I wanted to get involved.

In reconnecting with a long time friend, he introduced me to another friend of his who has joined CCDF-USA in Hillsborough County. She’s an almost retired attorney in Tampa and is now devoting most of her time to assisting a group of volunteers engage at the county level. I was fascinated to hear how they have been helping parents and concerned grandparents express themselves effectively with local officials and decision makers.

A week later, I had the joy of meeting the man who is working on getting a local county level organization going in more places around the country. He’s a local business man, who in the last half of his life was inspired by the work that the Alliance for Defending Freedom has been doing, and saw that there was a need for an organization that could help citizens engage at the county level. He shared some stories from some work that that they had been part of, and I recognized them because I had read about them in the regular news. They had been a part of making a good, positive difference.

He’s the one that gave me a copy of this book. He wants to assist citizens in their desire to “defend freedom.” He was alarmed to discover the role and amount of money that was being inserted into local, county level officials from international sources, specifically organizations and foundations that are funded by George Soros. I’ve heard the name, but like J. Edgar Hoover, didn’t know much about the guy.

This book is new. It’s only a few months old. The author, Matt Palumbo, has taken an enormous amount of time to research and footnote the myriad trails of money that originated in the fortune of George Soros. It’s a difficult book to read because of the amount of just raw data and figures.

He opens by giving a biography of Mr. Soros. Born in Hungary, raised during the Nazi occupation, and sharing significant experiences that must have shaped his worldview. He also gave an explanation of the influence of philosopher Karl Popper on his ideas of how the world should function. It’s where the name “Open Society” came from and why it’s used as a name on many of his endeavours.

Allow me to admit that I don’t understand this philosophy. It wouldn’t be appropriate to fault the author’s explanation. It’s quite possible that I don’t understand, because it’s not understandable. It may exist outside of rational thought. Soros seems to be the only one that purports it, yet, as the author argues, he’s often operating in contradiction to it.

The most powerful chapter of the book for me was the one describing the donations that Soros funded organizations and foundations have made in local politics. It’s mostly the story of District Attorney’s and how they have shifted their approach to a much softer view of petty crimes, attributed poverty to the cause of crimes, and chosen to not prosecute some categories of crimes, or crimes committed by certain segments of the population. It’s been very difficult on communities and we’ve seen that in the news recently.

The main argument of the book is that Soros is funding all of this, and it all comes from his worldview and what’s implied is that our society would be better off without him meddling in not only our affairs, but those of other countries around the world.

I was also interested in the chapter devoted to Soros’s involvement in the Ukraine, because the Ukraine is dominating our news these days. We know the Biden’s had some business there. And, now, I can see all the involvement Soros has had there. Soros was a hero there. It’s difficult to refute any arguments that they aren’t completely and hopelessly corrupt and it isn’t their fault.

Here’s the bottom line for me. I’m grateful to read this. I needed to know how pervasive Soros’s money is. However, I’m not convinced that he’s getting what he wants all the time, as much as people are getting money from him and doing all kinds of crazy things with it. The guy is 91 after all. And, there’s no way for him to control the size and scale of the operation he’s funding. Anyone that will lie and manipulate others can be sure to lie to himself. Money doesn’t cure that problem.

Leaving the topic of Soros, we don’t have a CCDF organization here in Pinellas County. It would be good to get one going. I would think that citizens here would be interested to know if and when one of our officials has betrayed their oath of office. It would also be good to know which County Commissioners, School Board Trustees, or if the Sheriff, or District Attorney, or Supervisor of Elections has been on staff at one of these foundations or organizations that Soros funds, or has received funds from them. That doesn’t make them guilty of anything. It’s just good to know what we might expect from them.

What about you? How involved in the political process are you? How involved do you want to be? Feel free to comment (publicly!) or send me a message (privately!).

 
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Posted by on March 17, 2022 in Book Review

 

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Book Review: “Puppetmaster – The Secret Life of J. Edgar Hoover” by Richard Hack

Book Review: “Puppetmaster – The Secret Life of J. Edgar Hoover” by Richard Hack

If we went for a coffee today, I might bring this up. I had no idea how corrupt the U.S. Government was back in the day. This was an eye-opening book, again, in a topic that I don’t know anything about. It’s not that I have never heard of J. Edgar Hoover, I have heard lots of people talking about how significant Hoover was, but I didn’t know anything about him.

Well…

What a character!

Hoover was basically an only child growing up, and excelled at everything he did. He was a loner, and may have been diagnosed on the autism spectrum if he was around today. His accomplishments as a youth were really incredible. He had what we would consider an ideal upbringing when it came to church and church attendance and participation as well. Sadly, he didn’t maintain that.

He really only had one job, working his way up from mail clerk while he was going to law school at night, all the way to the top job of the F.B.I. He was there when it was created, and was the driving force behind it’s genesis. He worked very hard, days, nights and weekends and was a diligent, meticulous government employee in his younger years.

When he finally rose to power, he kept his power, essentially by collecting people’s secrets and doing quite a bit of spying on fellow citizens without legal authorization. He was drawn to the salacious, and kept a private stash of pornographic material that had been collected by agents. Incredibly, there doesn’t seem to be any record of him personally acting on that pornographic material even though he never married. He died an old man, full of stress and years of spoiling himself. His faithful and long time secretary discretely destroyed all the sensitive, secret and illegal files that he kept.

Not only was he adept at discovering and keeping people’s private information, he was also skilled at public relations and had a well-crafted image in the media of himself and his department. Paranoia seemed to be the stimulus for that fastidious pursuit.

This was a well written book. For someone like me with no background information about Hoover, it served my purposes well.

The big takeaway for me, however, was the realization of how corrupt the U.S. Government has been. Hoover’s story started with President Harding and I was reading voraciously having no idea that this is how politics has worked for a very long time. As Hoover’s story continued through Roosevelt, Truman, Kennedy, LBJ, Nixon, over and over the corruption stood out to me. I suppose this is just how things actually get done, or not done. Incredible. May God have mercy on America.

We absolutely have to return to a moral society that prizes truth-telling, character and right-ness instead of expediency.

Let’s close this post on a high note…

I found this book in a thrift store that U-Turn for Christ runs in Crystal River, the same one that I found “Born Fighting” in. Two great reads, and a heavy dose of American History for almost no money! Love it!

 
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Posted by on March 14, 2022 in Book Review

 

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Book Review: “The Book of God – How We Got the Bible” by Kingstone Comics

Book Review: “The Book of God – How We Got the Bible” by Kingstone Comics

If we went for a coffee today, I’d be gushing about Kingstone Comics. I can’t believe I’ve never heard of these guys. I feel like I’ve been in and around Christian books all of my life and I feel like I’m an early adapter of Christian comics. Somehow we ended up with a copy of the Bible in comic strip when I was a kid in the late ‘70’s. I read it through twice and still remember some of the pictures that went along with specific stories.

A few years ago, Sergio Carriello did the graphics for “The Action Bible” which all my kids have read or at least had access to. It’s a beautiful update to the old “Picture Bible” that I had.

But, these are not the complete Bible, they are abridged and sanitized versions of the stories in the Bible. They are also “books.”

Enter Kingstone Comics. Years ago, Art Ayris was volunteering with the bus ministry at his church, First Baptist of Leesburg, Florida, and because of all of his interactions with unchurched kids, he was always looking for great materials to get to them.

Eventually, he wrote his own comic book. And, to make a long, beautiful, amazing, miraculous story short, I saw the warehouse and distribution center last week for well over 100 different comic books, compilation books, regular books and even a couple of movies that they have done.

They have had a lot of help, between investors, key Board Members, supportive church leadership, superb staff, excellent writers and over 60 artists, including Sergio Cariello and others who have drawn for Marvel/DC. Their product is beautiful and engaging, inspiring and they were busy. One good problem they have is keeping up with translation opportunities for other languages.

When I was there, the most popular comic book was the story of “Vladimir – The Prince of Russia.” It’s the story of someone the Lord used to bring Christianity to Russia. As I’m writing this post, I’m about halfway through it. Yes, it’s quite the story, and it is told well. They have a whole series fo comic books on significant people in Christian history including the Martyrs.

While I was there, I was astounded to see a comic book for each book of the Bible. Revelation is a popular one, and I loved seeing what these artists did with the descriptions there.

Another series that caught my eye was the “101 Questions.” It is almost complete. It’s a series of comic books that answer tough questions (think apologetics) about Christianity. I have read the 4th book in the series and it was refreshing for me to see how these timeless truths are being conveyed in a beautiful and engaging way.

But, as the title says… this post is a book review of “The Book of God – How We Got the Bible.” This was the first product that I opened and read. It is by Ben Avery and Javier Saltares and consisted of four parts and an epilogue all about the Bible. It covers the production, process preservation and proof of the Bible. You have to understand what a difficult task it is to tell this story. It could be really, really dry, with dates and technical terms and stories from ancient history with cultures that we are completely ignorant of.

But, this was so well done. Seriously, the content is college level. But, the delivery is kid level. I’ve read several resources on this topic, and there were things in this comic book that were not only new to me, but effortlessly communicated in a clear and understandable way.

I was further impressed by the artwork and overall outline and strategy for this book. This is a needed and desireable resource for Christians of all ages. I wish I knew about this when I was purchasing resources to stock “The Upper Room at Calvary.” This would have been very, very popular.

If not, check it out.. and buy at least one of them to enjoy yourself. And, then, join the hundreds of people that have been buying them for their churches, schools, friends, kids and grandkids. While I was there, they told me about a woman in her 80’s that has been purchasing and reading them for herself.

For me, I’m intrigued by the Martyr’s, that’s an area I’d like to know more about, and I’m enthused about learning about them through the genre of graphic novel.

If you already knew about Kingstone, would you let me know how and why and what your experience has been in the comments?

 
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Posted by on March 7, 2022 in Book Review

 

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Book Review: “Born Fighting – How the Scots-Irish Shaped America” by Jim Webb

Book Review: “Born Fighting – How the Scots-Irish Shaped America” by Jim Webb

So, a few weeks ago, I was invited to meet a couple of pastors for lunch and fellowship at Calvary Chapel Crystal River in Florida. While we were there, we toured the U-Turn Ranch they have established, and the nearby Thrift Store that is part of that ministry.

I’m a sucker for the book section at Thrift Stores and that’s where I spotted this book.

It was fascinating. The author charts the history of the Scots-Irish people from Scotland at the time of the Roman Empire when they built Hadrian’s wall all the way to the present day. What I didn’t know is that all of that redneck, hillbilly, good-ol’boy, mountain people, country people can be traced back to these Scots-Irish people and their culture.

The author’s premise, is that it’s this culture, shaped by the events starting with the Romans, through the English kings, through the migration to Ireland and the Ulster plantation and eventually to the Appalachian Mountains is the dominant culture that shaped the United States.

When he gets to the American Revolution, his argument begins to take shape, how it was this culture, patriotic, independent, yet able to organize into effective fighters was the main driver of the revolution. It was the soft, aristocratic, educated, plantation owners on the coasts that gave the intellectual reasoning, but these guys got the job done.

Andrew Jackson was the quintessential product of this culture and made the biggest impact as president. He stands in the same line as William Wallace.

I appreciated the time the author took to describe the Civil War from the perspective of families and people from this culture. That story is not often told.

And, then the author finished the book by describing his own parents and grandparents. These are incredible stories and represent many of the experiences of many Americans.

A more recent, and more emotional rendering of this culture is “Hillbilly Elegy” by JD Vance. They made a movie of that book that in my opinion doesn’t capture the full story. I think every pastor in America should read that book.

If you’re short on American history, and like me, weren’t paying attention at all in high school, this book will help you get up to speed pretty quickly, no matter what part of the country you are in.

 
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Posted by on February 21, 2022 in Uncategorized

 

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Book Review “Living From the Heart Jesus Gave You”

Book Review “Living From the Heart Jesus Gave You”

How I get a book is a story I like telling. In this case, when we did “family debriefing” with Compass Ministries last month, I met Roni Lacuesta the Executive Director. He gave me a couple of strong recommendations, and one of them was to read this book.

So, even though I’m currently unemployed, and have no income, I decided to buy the book anyway. Proverbs says to “Buy the truth and don’t sell it,” and “in all your getting, get wisdom” and how wisdom and insight and understanding should be the chief pursuits in life.

The book lists 5 authors: James G. Friesen, E. James Wilder, Anne M. Bierling, Rick Koepcke, and Maribeth Poole. It’s a book written by a group of psychologists and mental health workers from an organization called Shepherd’s House in California. It’s part of a group of resources they call “Life Model.”

The authors are trying to present a vision of how Christian community, specifically churches, can be a indispensable contribution to the recovery of trauma.

In the beginning of the book, they talk about the two major kinds of trauma, bad events happening to someone, and good experiences withheld from someone, and how each uniquely cripples a person’s development. They describe what attributes a person should exhibit in the various stages of maturity and what it looks like when their body grows beyond their maturity.

They also take the time to describe how the two major different types of trauma affect that process of maturity and how expensive and time-consuming it is to bring healing to someone through individual counselling. I appreciated how honest they were in discussing the shortcomings of that model of therapy. It’s not to be discarded, it’s just not sufficient to the task. They plainly state that what’s needed is the power of God and the involvement of key roles in the community, namely spiritual fathers, mothers and brothers and sisters.

It’s compelling. I could see how this would be appealing to all kinds of people, those who are suffering the affects of trauma, and those who have a soft heart. Certainly, it’s obvious, our expectation that involvement in church to be a healing and life-giving experience should go without saying.

Sadly, it’s not common. And, the authors faithfully point out that often our leaders exhibit immaturity themselves. It’s impossible to model maturity if you’re not mature. And, it’s hard to give what you haven’t received.

One of the most helpful things I did early on in ministry was attend the “Rapid Response Chaplain Training” offered by the Billy Graham Evangelistic Association. It gave me some tools and insight into trauma, shock and how to be the hands and feet and presence of Jesus in those situations. I found it very helpful and adopted that posture often in my interactions with people as a pastor over the years.

If you haven’t done something like that, this book would be a great resource to you, as it does a good job of introducing the broad outlines of what to expect. What I found valuable is the explanation of trauma and the time given to detailing the attributes of maturity. It gave me yet another lens of compassionately viewing myself and the people around me.

I’m curious if you have read this book? Or, been to a church that tried to implement it? Or, been involved with Shepherd’s House. If so, I’d like to hear your thoughts and experiences either through the comments or a direct message.

 
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Posted by on February 15, 2022 in Book Review

 

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Book Excerpt: “The Constitution of the United States – and Selected Writings of the Founding Fathers.”

Book Excerpt: “The Constitution of the United States – and Selected Writings of the Founding Fathers.”

Even my Canadian readers will want to pay attention here. In fact, this excerpt may resonate with any resident of the Commonwealth as much as it would to an American.

It will be quite some time before I do a “Book Review” post. This book has over 800 pages, and at the moment I’m just over 100 pages in. It’s not light reading, it’s mostly speeches and letters at this point. I think the book is organized in chronological order.

I can tell you what stands out to me so far, and then I’ll give the excerpts.

There’s a question I’ve had about America, and I’ve heard it a couple of times when I was in Canada and didn’t have a good answer for it. “How can God bless the United States, when the founders rebelled against the authority?” How can God bless a rebellion? They were supposed to be all Christians and pastors and godly people from a culture that was saturated in the Bible. Why did they not submit as Paul instructs us in Romans 13?

What was surprising to me in reading through these various speeches and letters so far, was how the founding fathers, John Hancock, Benjamin Franklin, Thomas Jefferson, James Otis, Thomas Paine and so forth were addressing that very question. And not doing it only to themselves, and to the residents of the American colonies, but also to the king, the British parliament, the British people, Ireland, Jamaica and even the Native Americans, all in separate letters, documents and speeches.

I’m positive that they used to require at least reading some of this in school. But, that would have been before my time.

At a minimum, we should publicly (or privately) read the “Declaration of Independence” in our celebration of the Fourth of July.

What else is fascinating, is that these speeches and arguments are appropriate, relevant and would be immensely helpful today.

So, here’s the excerpts I want to share with you. These are the lines and phrases and paragraphs that I have already read to a couple of friends that asked me about them. It’s from a speech that John Hancock gave in the Constitutional Congress after the Boston Massacre. You remember, John Hancock is the man that signed his name in super large letters at the bottom of the Declaration of Independence so that the king wouldn’t need his spectacles to see who signed it.

Yeah, that guy.

And, his speech was straight fire. And, boy, does it have something to say about our situation in 2022. Here’s some excerpts. This first one is in the second paragraph, after he apologizes for not being a good speaker and how he shouldn’t have been chosen on this occasion, but somebody needs to say something, so he will give it a go. He says:

“I have always, from my earliest youth, rejoiced in the felicity of my fellow-men; and have ever considered it as the indispensable duty of every member of society to promote, as far as in him lies, the prosperity of every individual, but more especially of the community to which he belongs and also as a faithful subject of the State, to use his utmost endeavours to detect, and having detected, strenuously to oppose every traitorous plot which its enemies may devise for its destruction. Security to the persons and properties of the governed is so obviously the design and end of civil government, that to attempt a logical proof of it, would be like burning tapers (candles) at noonday to assist the sun in enlightening the world; and it cannot be either virtuous or honorable to attempt to support a government of which this is not the great and principal basis; and it is to the last degree vicious and infamous to attempt to support a government which manifestly tends to render the persons and properties of the governed insecure. Some boast of being friends to government; I am a friend to righteous government, to a government founded upon the principles of reason and justice; but I glory in publicly avowing my eternal enmity to tyranny. Is the present system, which the British administration have adopted for the government of the colonies, a righteous government, or is it a tyranny?”

What stands out to me from that passage is two sentences:

“Security of the persons and properties of the governed is so obviously the design and end of civil government”

And…

… “I glory in publicly avowing my eternal enmity to tyranny.”

And, then he asks the question… is our current government doing that?

Then, he starts to make his case. And, after detailing some of the events that have occurred that are economic and then military in nature, he says:

“But this was not all: as though they thought it enough to violate our civil rights, they endeavoured to deprive us of the enjoyment of our religious privileges; to vitiate our morals, and thereby render us worthy of destruction. Hence the rude din of arms which broke in upon your solemn devotions in your temples, on that day hallowed by Heaven, and set apart by God himself for His peculiar worship. Hence, impious oaths and blasphemies so often tortured your unaccustomed ears. Hence, all the arts which idleness and luxury could invent were used to betray our youth of one sex into extravagance and effeminacy, and of the other, to infamy and ruin, and did they not succeed but too well? Did not a reverence for religious sensibly decay? Did not our infants almost learn to lisp out curses before they knew their horrid import? Did not our youth forget they were Americans, and regardless of the admonitions of the wise and aged servilely copy from their tyrants those vices which finally must overthrow the empire of Great Britain? And must I be compelled to acknowledge that even the noblest, fairest part of al the lower creation did not entirely escape the cursed snare? When virtue has once erected her throne in the female breast, it is upon so solid a basis that nothing is able to expel the heavenly inhabitant. But there have not been some, few indeed, I hope, whose youth and inexperience have rendered them a prey to wretches whose, upon the least reflection, they would have despised and hated as foes to God and their country? I fear there have been some such unhappy instances, or why have I seen an honest father clothed with shame; or why a virtuous mother drowned in tears?”

I didn’t know that the British government was imposing restrictions on their church services. That was surprising to me.

But, the line that jumped off the page to me was: “all the arts which idleness and luxury could invent were used to betray our youth of one sex into extravagance and effeminacy…”

That line will get you in a lot of trouble these days.

I know parts of that paragraph we have to read a couple of times, and it’s tempting to scan it and not take the time to try and understand what he’s saying. But, we are that youth he’s talking about. If we want to reject out of hand what he’s saying, we should at least try to understand it first.

He goes on to talk about the Boston Massacre, and calls for the day of March 5, 1770 to be remembered forever because of how unjust the whole affair was. And, then declares:

“But let not the miscreant host vainly imagine that we feared their arms. No; them we despised; we dread nothing but slavery. Death is the creature of a poltroon’s brains; ‘tis immortality to sacrifice ourselves for the salvation of our country. We fear not death.”

As the speech continues, these are some of the lines that I underlined.

“Let our misfortunes teach posterity to guard against such evils for the future.”

“The dark deeds of a treacherous cabal have been brought to public view.”

“This people will never be enslaved with their eyes wide open… a wise and brave people, when they know their danger, are fruitful in expedients to escape it.”

“At such a congress, a firm foundation may be laid for the security of our rights and liberties…”

Last excerpt:

“Suffer not yourselves to be betrayed, by the soft arts of luxury and effeminacy, into the pit digged for your destruction. Despise the glare of wealth. That people who pay greater respect to a wealthy villain than to an honest, upright man in poverty almost deserve to be enslaved; they plainly show that wealth, however it may be acquired, is, in their esteem, to be preferred to virtue.”

That to me, is straight, white-hot, fire…

He closes his speech with an appeal to God Almighty as the righteous judge of the whole earth who sees all, knows all, and raises up and pulls down kingdoms and empires as he pleases, and appeals for everyone to submit to His will and sovereignty.

I’d love it if you read the whole speech for yourself and then gave me your thoughts on it. You can read it here.

 
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Posted by on January 23, 2022 in Book Excerpts

 

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Book Excerpt: “The Real Anthony Fauci” – Chapter 12 – Germ Games

Book Excerpt: “The Real Anthony Fauci” – Chapter 12 – Germ Games

In my review of the book, I shared how the book starts out with easily observable characteristics of how Dr. Fauci had handled the Covid-19 pandemic poorly. That’s an easy argument to make, in spite of the fact that not many people in mainstream society have made it.

As the book progresses and the author begins to dig and answer the questions that arise in our minds, things become far more sinister and conspiratorial.

Much of the middle of the book goes back in history of Dr. Fauci himself through his long career at the NIAID and how he became the highest paid person in all of government. There’s a long section on the AIDS epidemic and HIV and how he handled that. We have such short memories.

Then, he shifts to Bill Gates, his history, and then details all of his connections stretching all the way back to the Rockefeller Foundation at the turn of the last century. Their ideologies are telling. They are worth an excerpt. And, then umpteen accounts of the hundreds of people that have positions of institutional power all over the globe, yet are working in lockstep concert with both Gates and Fauci.

The details of their first meeting and partnership are worth another excerpt, but I won’t do it, because I’m sure others have or will.

What I want to share is how the book comes to a close. And, that’s with the merger of the biomedical firms with the military and government.

In Chapter 12, the author gives the history of bioweapons and names the events and people involved that brought about the funding and institutions that are now dominating our day to day lives.

And, then pulling from news reports shows all the simulations that they have orchestrated over the last few years. Here’s the deal. All over the globe they have taken people from local law enforcement all the way up to government department heads through multi-day exercises to see how they would respond to a biomedical attack. It’s all under the guise of being prepared. But, actually, when you read what they do, it sure looks like what they were doing was training.

This is why it seemed like all the globe was running off the same playbook when it came to Covid-19 response. Within hours of each other, different nations came out with the same measures to contain Covid. Well, except for Sweden.

It was because of these simulations. And, here’s the names:
Topoff 2000-2007
Atlantic Storm 2003
Global Mercury 2003
Atlantic Storm 2005
SCL Simulation 2005
Lockstep Simulation 2010
Mars 2017
Spars 2017
Clade X 2018
Crimson Contagion 2019
Event 201 2019

It should go without saying to not research those on Google. Instead, use DuckDuckGo or something that’s not monitored by Big Tech. Qualified research on Google doesn’t exist anymore.

Here’s the excerpt. It’s from the results of the simulation they ran called “Crimson Contagion” in 2019.

“…organizers staged the Crimson Contagion exercise nationwide at over 100 centres. ‘Participation included 19 federal departments and agencies, 12 key states, 15 tribal nations and pueblos, 74 local health department and coalition regions, 87 hospitals, and over 100 healthcare and public health private sector partners.’ (footnote) The simulation scenario envisioned a ‘novel influenza’ pandemic originating in China labeled H7N9. As with COVID-19, air travellers rapidly spread the deadly respiratory illness across the globe.”

Crazy right? Did you click the footnote link? It’s to the NY Times.

Did you notice that it says: “Do Not Distribute” all over it? Robert F. Kennedy writes:

“…(The report) didn’t become public until the New York Times obtained a copy under the Freedom of Information Act and “published a front-page article on March 19, 2020, eight days after the WHO declared COVID-19 a pandemic. (footnote)”

He continues:

“The Times story contained this paragraph: ‘The October 2019 report documents that officials at the Department of Homeland Security and Health and Human Services, and even at the White House’s National Security Council, were aware of the potential for a respiratory virus outbreak originating in China to spread quickly to the United States and overwhelm the nation.’ (footnote) The New York Times takeaway missed altogether the larger and more significant stories: that the Crimson Contagion’s planners precisely prédictives every element of the COVID-19 pandemic — from the shortage of masks to specific death numbers — months before COVID-19 was ever identified as a threat and that their overarching countermeasure was the preplanned demolition of the American Constitution by a scrupulously choreographed palace coup.”

Earlier on the page he writes:

“The Crimson Contagion exercise achieved eerily accurate forecasting with numbers that precisely predicted the official casualty data for COVID-19: 110 million forecasted illnesses, 7.7 million predicted hospitalizations, and 568,000 deaths in the United States alone.”

Specific death numbers. That’s crazy.

Of course, this little snippet is provided to whet your appetite. You really should read this book.

I won’t provide a link, but I’ve read reports that there was a simulation that just wrapped up that was about global economic collapse.

Robert F. Kennedy Jr.’s book doesn’t end with much hope. But, we need hope. And, I’ve found great hope and comfort in another book, an ancient one, specifically, the book of Psalms. In it, people like you and me who have faced the prospect of danger, or the results of evil people’s machinations to reject God, disregard his imminent justice and wreak wickedness all over the world. They write about that, openly, poetically, emotionally, in these plaintive phrases to God, the just judge of the whole world.

Evil won’t win. It can’t. “There’s no wisdom or counsel that can prevail against the Lord.” He is the just judge, and he watches over the righteous and the innocent. His ways are past finding out. What we can do, is choose to trust Him to work and to move on the behalf of the oppressed and speak the truth to our neighbour.

This is my attempt at that.

Maranatha.

 
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Posted by on January 21, 2022 in Book Excerpts

 

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Book Excerpts: “The Real Anthony Fauci” – Chapter 10 – More Harm Than Good

Book Excerpts: “The Real Anthony Fauci” – Chapter 10 – More Harm Than Good

My dad used to say, “if they let you shoot the gun, shoot it until they take it away from you.” It was in reference to preaching in churches. It should be obvious that he wasn’t talking about a literal gun, but using it as a metaphor for doing something good that needed to be done, for the joy of doing it, recognizing that there may not be much time.

That’s how I feel with these book excerpts. As long as I can post them, I’ll keep doing it!

Here’s the one that I usually start with. It’s the one that stunned me the most. And, it’s personal. It really doesn’t have anything to do with Covid-19 or the Covid vaccines, or the lockdowns or anything. It has to do with childhood vaccines. Look at what Robert F. Kennedy Jr. writes in a section titled “Allergy to Placebo Testing”:

“Most medicinal products cannot get licensed without first undergoing randomized placebo-controlled trials that compare health outcomes — including all-cause mortalities — in medicated versus unmedicated cohorts. Tellingly, in March 2017, I met with Dr. Fauci, Francis Collins and a White House referee (and separately with Peter Marks from CBER at FDA) to complain that HHS was, by then, mandating 69 doses of sixteen vaccines (footnote) for America’s children, none of which had ever been tested for safety against placebos prior to licensing. Dr. Fauci and Dr. Collins denied that this was true and insisted that those vaccines were safety tested. They were unable, however, after several weeks, to provide us a single citation for a single clinical trial using an inert placebo against a vaccine. In October 2017, Del Bigtree and Aaron Siri — who both attended these meetings — joined me in suing HHS under the Freedom of Information Act to produce the long-promised safety studies. (footnote) Ten months after the meeting with Fauci and Collins, on the courthouse steps, HHS admitted that we were, in fact, correct: none of the mandated childhood vaccines had been tested for safety in pre-licensing inert placebo tests. (footnote). The best of Bill Gates’s African vaccines are all on this list. But Bill Gates also uses a large retinue of much more dangerous and demonstrably ineffective vaccines in Africa — ones that Western countries have actually rejected because of dire safety signals.”

The footnotes are illuminating.

However… what jumped off the page to me was…

NONE OF THE MANDATED CHILDHOOD VACCINES HAD BEEN TESTED FOR SAFETY!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

And, when you read their response, in the last footnote… argh! Especially when you compare that to the second footnote which is the letter they were responding to.

This is a scam. And, it needs to end.

That last line, about how Bill Gates uses the vaccines, that Western countries have rejected, in Africa is a straight up crime.

I won’t go into the detail here, you’ll need to read the book to get the details of that. Crazy stuff. Like doing vaccinations that include sterilization ingredients, in only women of childbearing age. All the vaccines were kept in a hotel, along with the medical staff, so that no vaccines are left lying around for anyone to pick up and run some tests on. Every morning, the staff would leave the hotel with the vaccines, go administer them in some remote area, and then pack up and go back to the hotel every night. And, then they tied funding for public health from the WHO or the UN to the percentage of vaccine uptake among the population.

That’s a crime against humanity.

And, if it doesn’t move you, then maybe what they did in NY for years among foster kids with vaccine trials for HIV might.

Again, it’s detailed in this book. Too much to write here.

I’ve got one more excerpt I want to share with you in another post.

 
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Posted by on January 19, 2022 in Book Excerpts

 

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